Specimen of the rare social recluse spider

spiderwomanstacy:

headcanon that night vale has its own version of “breaking bad,” only instead of being about a chemistry teacher who cooks meth it’s about a sheriff’s secret police officer who bakes illegal wheat and wheat by-products. it’s called “baking bad.”

thebicker:

spinsterprivilege:

lianabrooks:

britegreenstar:

libraryadvocates:

lalie:

The fact that the ALA shared this link is so gloriously bitter and angry and I love it.

Is there a portmanteau for that? Angritter? Bangry? 

My library card already gets me multiple “real” books, e-books, audiobooks, magazines and movies per month. For free.

Kindle Unlimited offers nothing from big presses, and no guarantee the authors will get paid fairly for their work. Libraries buy the book up front for a higher price (and a better binding). Kindle Unlimited offers the authors a variable percentage of a as-yet-undetermined-and-unannounced amount of money. 
While Amazon touts Kindle Unlimited at “Netflix For Books!” the reality is Netflix signed contracts with everyone whose work they offer so that actors, screen writers, best boys, and the rest of those people get paid for the shows and movies you watch. Amazon does not.
That means your favorite author isn’t being compensated for their time or work. If you love a book series and want to see the next one get published: buy the book or hit the library. Starving authors quit writing because they like eating. 

Not only is your favorite author not being compensated for their work, but the editors who help shape your favorite author’s work, the marketing departments who work really, incredibly hard at getting the word out for their authors (in an increasingly glutted marketplace and often, in smaller and mid-sized houses, with low budgets), the designers who create beautiful covers and carefully lay out the interiors of your favorite books so that you can read them easily, etc etc also all lose out when Amazon strong arms publishers into giving them huge discounts that can—and have!—put small publishers (particularly vulnerable ones like LGBTQ and feminist presses) completely out of business.

I really, really encourage everyone to do the following two things:
1) Order books from Powell’s, not Amazon. I bought Edan Lepucki’s “California” from them, and they offer flat $4.95 shipping on orders under $50, and free shipping on orders over $50. They have used and new books and they offer discounts on big sellers. The prices aren’t AS low as Amazon but they’re comparable. I know it’s impossible to completely eliminate buying things on Amazon, but at least try a little bit.
2) Check out your local library. I lived in LA for about 6 years before checking out the LA Public Library System. I was a fool! Now I get ebooks on my Kindle without ever having to go to the library. (pssst - If you don’t finish the book in the three weeks you have it on loan, turn off your Kindle’s wifi and it won’t go away.) I pick up physical books at the location less than a mile from me. I get audiobooks for long drives. I still buy physical books that I want to have for more than three weeks, but for most of my reading, the library is the way to go. If you’re cynical, think of it as getting a better return on investment from your tax dollars.

thebicker:

spinsterprivilege:

lianabrooks:

britegreenstar:

libraryadvocates:

lalie:

The fact that the ALA shared this link is so gloriously bitter and angry and I love it.

Is there a portmanteau for that? Angritter? Bangry? 

My library card already gets me multiple “real” books, e-books, audiobooks, magazines and movies per month. For free.

Kindle Unlimited offers nothing from big presses, and no guarantee the authors will get paid fairly for their work. Libraries buy the book up front for a higher price (and a better binding). Kindle Unlimited offers the authors a variable percentage of a as-yet-undetermined-and-unannounced amount of money. 

While Amazon touts Kindle Unlimited at “Netflix For Books!” the reality is Netflix signed contracts with everyone whose work they offer so that actors, screen writers, best boys, and the rest of those people get paid for the shows and movies you watch. Amazon does not.

That means your favorite author isn’t being compensated for their time or work. If you love a book series and want to see the next one get published: buy the book or hit the library. Starving authors quit writing because they like eating. 

Not only is your favorite author not being compensated for their work, but the editors who help shape your favorite author’s work, the marketing departments who work really, incredibly hard at getting the word out for their authors (in an increasingly glutted marketplace and often, in smaller and mid-sized houses, with low budgets), the designers who create beautiful covers and carefully lay out the interiors of your favorite books so that you can read them easily, etc etc also all lose out when Amazon strong arms publishers into giving them huge discounts that can—and have!—put small publishers (particularly vulnerable ones like LGBTQ and feminist presses) completely out of business.

I really, really encourage everyone to do the following two things:

1) Order books from Powell’s, not Amazon. I bought Edan Lepucki’s “California” from them, and they offer flat $4.95 shipping on orders under $50, and free shipping on orders over $50. They have used and new books and they offer discounts on big sellers. The prices aren’t AS low as Amazon but they’re comparable. I know it’s impossible to completely eliminate buying things on Amazon, but at least try a little bit.

2) Check out your local library. I lived in LA for about 6 years before checking out the LA Public Library System. I was a fool! Now I get ebooks on my Kindle without ever having to go to the library. (pssst - If you don’t finish the book in the three weeks you have it on loan, turn off your Kindle’s wifi and it won’t go away.) I pick up physical books at the location less than a mile from me. I get audiobooks for long drives. I still buy physical books that I want to have for more than three weeks, but for most of my reading, the library is the way to go. If you’re cynical, think of it as getting a better return on investment from your tax dollars.

kois0:

nerdymouse:

Yet they claim that the queer community is overly sexual and puts our sex lives out there. Straight people are weird. 

this isnt even weird anymore man it’s plain disgusting

aquariantides:

adulthood is just an endless stream of phone calls you don’t want to make but have to

nudityandnerdery:

dreamsoftheshininghorizon:

nudityandnerdery:

Senator: Superheroes have to register their secret identities!
Natasha: There’s six of us. Rogers has a Smithsonian exhibit on him, Stark won’t stop telling the world he’s Iron Man, and for the rest of us, I…

lookdifferentmtv:

Spotlight Series: 5 Times George Takei Inspired Us

1. When he took on his legendary role as Sulu and gave the Asian community a hero. “So many people have told me that for the first time they had someone they could relate to and be proud of when they turned on Star Trek… because they saw an Asian character who was not a stereotype, who was in many ways a hero, who was part of the leadership team…and that made them feel proud.” (YouTube)

2.  When he opened up about growing up on a Japanese internment camp. “Life in prison became routine. We lined up three times a day to eat lousy food, I went with my father to a mass shower, and then I started school. The irony that I still remember is that they taught us the Pledge of Allegiance, and I could see the barbed wire fence and the sentry tower right outside my schoolhouse window as I recited, “…with liberty and justice for all.” (The Daily Beast)

3. When he marched with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as a teenage activist. “I was in a civil rights musical at that time, Fly Blackbird, and I met Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and shook his hand. I was involved in activism from my teenage days, then the peace movement during the Vietnam War, then the redress movement for Japanese-Americans.” (The Daily Beast)

4. When he broke his silence on LGBT rights and came out.  “I decided to come out to the press after then-Governor Schwarzenegger vetoed legislation granting marriage equality in California. I was outraged that he would cave to political pressures, but also inspired by the young people I saw demonstrating against his actions.” (The Huffington Post)

5. When he reminded us that inclusiveness is not only better, but healthy too. 

For all the awesome that you are, George Takei we <3 you! 

Please don't reply to this. I just wanted to tell you I'm so sorry for what happened, and that you should take all the time you need to grieve.

druidspell:

seananmcguire:

Okay, so this is a thing I have explained before, and I now need to explain again, and I am doing it publicly because I feel that maybe I have not explained it clearly enough here on Tumblr.  This is not meant to single any one person out.  But:

I have clinical OCD.  One of the ways it manifests is that people cannot give me permission not to answer things.  The only one who can declare comment amnesty is me.  Otherwise, the unanswered asks and comments will literally gnaw at me.  They will haunt me.  They will render me physically unable to sleep at night.  I will start having panic attacks because of the unanswered email and messages with “please don’t answer this” worked into the text, because everything I am says “answer it,” and everything I am says “don’t break the rules, don’t go against what people ask.”

Do you see the problem?

When I said “please do not message me about the death of my cat,” I meant “please do not message me about the death of my cat,” not “please do not message me unless you also give me permission not to answer.”  I still have to answer.  I cannot help it.

I am so, so grateful that other people are sorry for my loss.  It doesn’t make the pain stop, but pain shared is pain lessened.  At the same time, having people go directly and explicitly counter to what I have asked makes things worse, because now I am heartbroken and dehydrated and not being listened to.

I am not trying to be harsh, even though I understand that I may sound that way.  But please, do not message me about Lilly’s death.  Please, do not give me permission not to answer you.  Only I can give myself that permission.

Please, be gentle with me right now.

So hey, using this ask and response as an example (not to single out either of the primary participants), this is just a general reminder:

When someone asks you to not do a thing, and you do the thing anyway, you are being disrespectful.

When someone asks you to not do a thing, and you do the thing anyway, even with the best intentions, you are being disrespectful.

When someone says “Please don’t message me about this topic” and you message them about that topic in spite of their request, you are being disrespectful.

Your desire to do the thing does not trump their desire to not have the thing done unto them, regardless of who or how or why the thing is being done. 

This goes for talking to people who have clearly stated their desire to be left alone; reblogging posts which have “do not reblog” in the body or the tags, demanding that random bloggers who belong to marginalized groups educate your non-marginalized-along-that-axis ass about their marginalization after they’ve posted about how they want people not to do this, harassing people online or off, and a host of other topics. If someone has clearly stated their preference for the level of interaction they prefer and/or are capable of dealing with and you ignore that preference, you are being disrespectful and you need to stop.

imissnepeta:

the-soul-eater-alchemist:

You write a novel.

Everyone loves the novel.

Someone makes a movie based off your novel.

Your favorite actor is cast in the movie based on your novel.

You become best friends with said actor.

It can’t happen if you don’t sit your ass down and write your novel.

I love how this person just knows we fantasize about this

Hello! I'm not a tattoo artist but I do like to learn the science behind tattoos, particularly why certain tattoos fade terribly (such as white ink tattoos and inner finger/hand tattoos). Lately I've been seeing a lot of debate on the new "watercolor" tattoo trend. Some artists say they fade terribly, others say they can look great if the right technique is used. I have yet to see one that's faded and I can't find any pictures to judge for myself. Any thoughts/opinions on this new trend?

electricalivia:

From what I know hopefully I can shed some more light on it, I’ve always been very interested in every aspect of my craft, not just the art and have explained this to my clients plenty of times.

All tattoos fade, over time sunlight can bleach out color (like if you’ve ever left an image/art taped to a window) or your body might naturally metabolize certain parts of the pigment - pigment has come a far way over the years but it’s still got a lot of different recipes and techniques claiming to be the “best” and none can claim perfection.

While some inks can completely disappear in your skin (I’ve got a certain shade between yellow/orange that just dropped out of a tattoo on my arm) real black tattoo ink never will. Even with EXTREME fading, you can still see a tattoo that used to be black. (old timey ink turns that classic blue)

~*therefore*~ A tattoo that doesn’t have a black outline (like a watercolor tattoo, or white ink) is going to fade just like any other color tattoo - but it won’t have that black to fall back on. It won’t be a faded yellow tulip, it will be a faded blob. Some tattooers make it sound like if you don’t have a black outline the tattoo will spread or somehow move throughout your skin. No. It will just be much harder for someone to discern the image.

Always remember pigment heals under your skin - so white, really light blue, and light shades of yellow are all going to be affected by your skin tone. White is barely visible when it actually heals.

Knowing this makes everything else simple.

Watercolor tattoos can be as bold and bright as any others, be sure you find an artist that is really comfortable and confident with their color work. The pigment needs to be packed in really well without overworking the skin, and the contrast needs to be high enough to make up for the fact you don’t have an outline. (A great example is the color portrait work of Nikko Hurtado - his tattoos are not lacking anything sans outline)

The rest is up to you

Follow your artist’s aftercare instructions closely, heal your tattoo as well as you can - there’s NO reason not to. Don’t go off on your own thing, they’re the one that has to back it if it doesn’t heal right.

Wear sun protection - if you only had one tshirt to wear the rest of your life you would take damn good care of it. Wear strong sun screen on your color tattoos to prevent fading (I’ve even worn it in tanning beds and it doesn’t leave a weird border, I promise.) and don’t leave your tattoo in direct sunlight more than you need to. This doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy sunlight, just be conscious of it.

Some pigments fade faster than others, but with care your tattoo should stay beautiful for a long time, and as a last resort you can always touch up an old tattoo that doesn’t have enough impact anymore.